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#FamilyStories Meet the Author: Valerie Reynolds

I’ve kept a journal since 1982, and I still write in it. I enjoy looking back at some of the old journals and remembering many things that I had forgotten, funny sayings from the grandchildren, trips that we took. We traveled a lot. I’d forgotten the details, and I’m enjoying reading those now and reminiscing all by myself.

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#FamilyStories Meet the Author: Pam Parker

When I began writing “The Blue Cardboard Box,” I thought first about my father and all he had never learned about his birth family. Quickly, though, my focus shifted to my biological grandmother, Velma Gasteyer, and to the devastating combination of grief and mental illness which led to her sad existence (more than half her life) in an asylum.

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#FamilyStories Meet the Author: Joanne Nelson

“When I write in the piece about staring at the picture for so long that I can feel the ridges of the chair against my thumb, and can hear the cupboard door open, I’m telling the truth. That was a gift the narrative gave me—that I could so completely reenter that photograph and be present with my big brothers.”

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#FamilyStories Meet the Author: Patricia Ann McNair

Patricia Ann McNair

“[A]t its beginnings, “Climbing the Crooked Trails” was for an audience of visitors to an art gallery. As I went on with the material, and got deeper into my reading of the letters and documents, I realized that my reaction to what I was reading was potentially interesting.”

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#FamilyStories Meet the Author: Myles Hopper

“[W]riting memoir is my preferred way to explore universal themes, I try at all times to keep foremost in my mind the concept of universal readers, persons unknown to me who I hope will read my stories and find in them something of value as they examine their own histories and contemplate what might come next.”

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